Saint Gaudens 1907 high relief

1907 saint gaudens high relief 1907 saint gaudens high relief reverse

In 1907, a small number of experimental pieces were struck.  These coins, now known as “extra high relief” required about nine press strikes to produce.  The experiment annoyed the chief mint engraver Charles Barber.  The relief was lowered slightly, and later in 1907, the first St. Gaudens “high relief” double eagles were produced.  The minting process of the initial high relief coins was difficult.  Theodore Roosevelt kept the pressure on the mint by stating "I don't care if it takes all day and all night to mint a single coin." Three press strikes were required to bring out the detail.  After 11,250 were produced, mint engraver Charles Barber redesigned the coin in flatter relief.  Barber also changed the Roman numerals for the date into Arabic numbers.  Later in 1907, 361,667 coins were produced.

The US mint did not attempt another high relief double eagle until 2009.

 

the end of roman numerals

In addition to lowering the relief of the design, Mint engraver, Charles Barber also changed the Roman numerals for the date into Arabic numbers.  Later in 1907, 361,667 coins were produced.

The next controversy concerned the motto "In God we trust."

 

St. Gaudens

St. Gaudens information

Teddy Roosevelt liked the design of the ten dollar eagle but made one radical suggestion: Add an Indian headdress.

How much do Saint Gaudens double eagles cost? Go to the Saint Gaudens auction page to find out.

Neither Augustus St. Gaudens nor Teddy Roosevelt wanted the words In God We Trust on the coins. Click on the link to find out why.

Saint Gaudens on this site